Seasonal affair

September 25, 2014
The sixth of seven trends we gleaned from Vogue's September issue.
Heather Ingram
Designer,
based in Landor Cincinnati

55006D1_Seasonal Affair _Blog Post _hi 01-02

Pastels are no longer just for spring. Soft, romantic colors are flirting with fall, taking on more dusty, muted tones and alluding to something secret.

55006D1_Seasonal Affair _Blog Post _hi 01-03

Inspiration images:

Georgio Armani: Fall campaign 2014
Gucci: Fall campaign 2014
Gucci: Fall campaign 2014 

Merchandise:

1. Stella McCartney: Oversized 54mm Cat's-Eye Sunglasses
2. Chloé: Cate Medium Smooth and Pebbled Leather Satchel
3. Reiss: Men’s Blazer
4. AllSaints: Mitre Deck Shorts
5. Cole Haan: Bergen Wingtip Mint Leaf Suede 


55006D1_Fashion In Action _Blog Post _hi 01D-02-04 


All images copyright of their respective authors. Permission being requested.

Category: Customer experience

The Feminatrix

September 24, 2014
The fifth of seven trends we gleaned from Vogue's September issue.
Heather Ingram
Designer,
based in Landor Cincinnati

55006D1_Feminatrix _Blog Post _ji 01-02

Femininity as a force to be reckoned with—dominating, commanding attention and complete submission. Part leather and part lace, there’s nothing more powerful than a sharply-dressed woman.

55006D1_Feminatrix _Blog Post _ji 01-03

Inspiration images:

Versace: Fall campaign 2014
Oscar De La Renta: Fall campaign 2014
L’Oréal: Fall campaign 2014

Merchandise:

1. Helmut Lang: Petal Leather Puff Vest
2. Versace: Medusa Studded Bracelet
3. Dior: Small "Lady Dior" Bag
4. Christian Louboutin: Rouge Louboutin
5. Louis Vuitton: Perfecto Sandal
6. Versace: Studs Ladies Cat-Eye Black


55006D1_Fashion In Action _Blog Post _hi 01D-02-04 


All images copyright of their respective authors. Permission being requested.

Category: Customer experience

Modern nomad

September 23, 2014
The fourth of seven trends we gleaned from Vogue's September issue.
Heather Ingram
Designer,
based in Landor Cincinnati

55006D1_Fashion In Action _Modern Nomad _ji 01-02

Life is a journey—a trip through different cultures, experiences, patterns, colors, styles, and fabrics. To be a nomad is to be a canvas layered with stories and meaning. 

55006D1_Fashion In Action _Modern Nomad _ji 01-03

Inspiration images:

Con Brio: Fall campaign 2014
Burberry: Fall campaign 2014
Vogue, “Carnival of color,” 2014

Merchandise:

1. Saint Laurent: Multicolor Crewneck Sweater
2. Anthropologie: Under Sun Pillow
3. Burberry: The Bloomsbury in Hand-painted Leather
4. Candela: Arlo Heel
5. Etro: 100% Wool Cape


55006D1_Fashion In Action _Blog Post _hi 01D-02-04 


All images copyright of their respective authors. Permission being requested.

Category: Customer experience
Unless Alibaba goes beyond the usual checklist of branding tactics, my opinion is that it is not going to be able to overtake its primary competitors.
Allen Adamson
Chairman, North America,
based in Landor New York

Did you get your share? Neither did I. The hot share of the day, that is—Alibaba, the newest name on the New York Stock Exchange, a company that just pulled off the largest initial public offering  on the United States stock market and that opened its first official trading day with an overall market value of $168 billion.

If you’re a financial pundit, you know that this is big bucks, two and a half times the size of eBay. If you’re a technology pundit, you know that Alibaba’s business model is like a mix of eBay and Amazon; it’s a massive online retailer that sold merchandise worth more than $296 billion in the last year or so. And if you’re either a financial pundit or a technology pundit, you most likely have a few questions regarding the current and future state of Alibaba relative to your respective areas of expertise. As a branding pundit, I have my own question: Will Alibaba be the first Chinese brand that has what it takes to make the leap from local market to global market?

Despite the exponential growth of huge companies in China, no major Chinese brand yet has figured out a way to play on the world stage. For example, even after Lenovo bought buying IBM’s computer business, including ThinkPad, and Motorola Mobility, it still hasn’t cracked the local-to-global code in terms of worldwide brand-name dominance or market share. Neither has home appliance manufacturer Haier, which designs and develops a wide range of products from air conditioners to washing machines to refrigerators. These are incredibly successful companies, mind you, financial powerhouses, but only on certain areas of the planet.

Sure, each of these Chinese companies, along with others, has done the right things in terms of Branding 101 tactics, from advertising to Olympic sponsorships to logo and package design to the manufacturing of well-made goods to user-friendly web sites and customer care. But this hasn’t been enough to enable them to make the transformation from local to global brands. To do this takes going beyond boilerplate branding tactics. In the broader Asian market, for example,  Samsung was able to transform itself from a South Korean brand to a global brand as the result of product designs that were different from those of its competitors in ways that were truly meaningful to consumers. It’s a brand that continues to give Apple a run for its money. Asian automobile manufacturers, including Honda, Toyota, and Hyundai, have also made the leap to global scale by means of innovative product design, offering features that consumers from Tokyo to Tallahassee see as categorical game changers.

Yet while several Asian companies have managed to transform their manufacturing scale and expertise into global brands, to date Chinese companies have not been among them. One reason could be that when you have such an immense home-based market, there isn’t as much pressure to move beyond your borders. The local market is sufficient enough to fuel the bottom line.

But from my branding pundit’s perspective, I think it’s more than this. Much like Samsung and Honda, unless Alibaba goes beyond the usual checklist of branding tactics, my opinion is that it is not going to be able to overtake its primary competitors, be it Amazon or eBay. Sure, it has a magical mystical name, provocative and evocative, as in “Open Sesame” and anything you want to buy can be yours. Sure, it has a user interface as easy and nimble as Amazon’s. And, yes, it has a supercharged public relations machine, evidenced by its supercharged initial offering price. But to transform itself from a Chinese brand to a global brand, it’s not a matter of going through the typical branding playbook. This is not enough to escape the gravitational pull of the Chinese market. To do this, Alibaba will have to prove, categorically, that it is different in a way that is relevant to the world’s consumers. Unless it does this, Alibaba will certainly continue to succeed, but it won’t be the first Chinese brand to make the jump from local to global.

 

Originally published on Forbes.com.

Category: Brand strategy & positioning

Shaping roles

September 22, 2014
The third of seven trends we gleaned from Vogue's September issue.
Heather Ingram
Designer,
based in Landor Cincinnati

55006D1_Fashion In Action _Shaping Roles _ji 01-02

A little mystery goes a long way—this year’s September issue proves androgyny can be alluring. A boxy overcoat with minimal makeup leaves you wanting more.

55006D1_Fashion In Action _Shaping Roles _ji 01-03

Inspiration images:

Giorgio Armani: Fall campaign 2014
Bally: Fall campaign 2014
Equipment: Fall campaign 2014 

Merchandise:

1. Balenciaga: Cable Shopper M Patent Leather Gray
2. French Connection: Leather Combo Cut Away Coat
3. Tom Ford: White Patchouli
4. Emporio Armani: Tuxedo Trousers In Cady
5. Fendi: 2jours Bracelet
6. Fendi: Goldmine Flat Boot 


55006D1_Fashion In Action _Blog Post _hi 01D-02-04 


All images copyright of their respective authors. Permission being requested.

Category: Customer experience
Displaying 1-5 of 309
More results
Choose one:
Share Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInEmail